The ideal body has a framework of curves and arches that, with the joints, support and balance the body’s weight. When spinal curves or foot arches flatten or are exaggerated, our center of gravity is shifted. The result? Pain!

The more self-imposed problems often come from poor ergonomics when using the computer or doing some other activity repetitively over a long period of time that disturbs the balance of the body’s structural components. Even worse is doing an activity incorrectly and repetitively.

The body is all about balance. If the bones are in their proper places, joints meeting as they should, then the muscles are not fighting against each other or against misaligned or stuck bony elements to facilitate movement. A balanced body is a body with fluid, painless movement.

Foot pain causes are many. These include Imbalanced, strained muscles pull on bones, joints, and ligaments, rotating and tilting skeletal components throughout the human form. Rippling upward from our foundation, improper foot structure or use can cause symptoms all the way up to the head. The problem may appear small and insignificant, but the cascade it can initiate can be damaging.

We don’t tend to think of our feet until they exhibit some problem. These trusty, pyramid-shaped stabilizers of the body do their job virtually unthought of as we go about our tasks from day to day. But your whole body knows it when your feet hurt. Their pain is radiated to other areas disturbed by the awkward gait or tentative foot strike of the injured area.

Whenever there is an injury to an area, other areas compensate for the lost movement. If you limp, the other leg attempts to take up the slack. In so doing, it is strained and more easily injured itself. In protecting the original site of pain, the body is brought out of balance and into a state of strain and dysfunction.

To illustrate, let’s consider the common problem of flat feet. The normal foot has nearly the same arch when it is bearing weight and when it is not. Flat feet have various degrees of arch degradation when the body’s weight is on them.

As the arch rotates inward, the foot also rotates forward. The tibia or lower leg bone descends and turns internally with the flattened arch, pulling the entire skeletal frame with it. The toes point outward, and the leg becomes functionally shorter. The Achilles tendon at the heel bows inward. The tibia’s rotation takes with it the knee. The body’s center of gravity is forced forward to the forefoot, as is the body’s weight.

Pain and Posture from the Feet Up 1
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